© 2019 by Yasmine Roth. 

2020 JUDGES

DAVID AMADO has been music director of the Delaware Symphony Orchestra since 2003, and in July 2016 he began a second music directorship at the Atlantic Classical Orchestra in Florida.

As a guest conductor Amado has led numerous prominent orchestras. In addition to the St. Louis Symphony, where he served as associate conductor from 2001 to 2004, he has led the Philadelphia Orchestra, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Royal Stockholm Philharmonic, Rochester Philharmonic, and the Chicago, Detroit, Houston, Milwaukee, National, New World, and Toronto symphonies. Recent engagements have included the Mobile, New Bedford, New Haven and Toronto symphony orchestras and California’s Symphony Silicon Valley. In June of 2019, he will make his debut at the Mostly Modern Festival in Saratoga Springs, New York.

Amado has been praised by the media, audiences, and fellow musicians for his deep musical insight and visceral energy. These qualities have allowed him to reinvigorate the Delaware Symphony, which has become a premier regional orchestra during his tenure. In 2010 the DSO released a critically acclaimed CD on the Telarc label, partnering with the Los Angeles Guitar Quartet in concertos by Joaquín Rodrigo and Sergio Assad; the recording debuted at number 11 on the Billboard charts and earned a Latin Grammy nomination. April of 2018 saw the release of a NAXOS recording featuring the DSO and Brasil Guitar Duo under Amado’s direction in concerti by Paulo Bellinati and Leo Brouwer.

Amado began his musical training in piano, studying in The Juilliard School’s pre-college and college divisions before going on to Indiana University, where he received a master's degree in instrumental conducting. Returning to New York, he pursued further conducting studies at Juilliard with Otto-Werner Mueller. His first professional conducting post, an apprenticeship with the Oregon Symphony, was followed by a six-year tenure with the St. Louis Symphony, where he served as both a staff conductor at the orchestra and music director of the St. Louis Symphony Youth Orchestra.

Violinist GLENN DICTEROW has established himself worldwide as one of the most prominent American concert artists of his generation.

Mr. Dicterow, concertmaster of the New York Philharmonic for 34 years, an all-time record in that major orchestral position, became the first holder of the Robert Mann Chair in Strings and Chamber Music at the USC Thornton School of Music in 2013. He is also the Chairman of the Orchestral Performance Program at New York’s Manhattan School of Music. He is as dedicated to passing along a great musical legacy as he once was to his orchestral work, while maintaining an active career as an orchestral soloist, a recitalist and a chamber musician.

Glenn Dicterow first came to prominence at the age of 11, making his solo debut in Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, where his father, Harold Dicterow, served as principal of the second violin section for 52 years. He first appeared with the New York Philharmonic in 1967, at the age of 18, performing the Tchaikovsky Concerto under the baton of André Kostelanetz.

Dicterow joined the Los Angeles Philharmonic as Associate Concertmaster in 1971, becoming Concertmaster there before turning 25. He came to New York as that orchestra’s Concertmaster in 1980, while soloing annually with the Philharmonic in each of his 34 years.

In a New York Philharmonic tour in 1986, Dicterow was featured as the soloist in Leonard Bernstein’s Serenade, with Bernstein himself conducting. He performed the Carmen Fantasy under Zubin Mehta as part of the New York Philharmonic’s 1990 “Live From Lincoln Center” telecast, and he was a soloist in the orchestra’s 1982 concert at the White House. Another career highlight was his performance of the Barber Violin Concerto at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China during the Philharmonic’s 1998 tour of Asia.

A graduate of the Juilliard School, where he was a student of Ivan Galamian, he also studied with Joachim Chassman, Naoum Blinder, Manuel Compinsky, Erno Neufeld, Gerald Vinci, Eudice Shapiro, Jascha Heifetz and Henryk Szeryng. His shelf of recordings is endless, as the Philharmonic’s Concertmaster, in a large array of solo assignments, both of the great romantic concerti and of the 20th Century classics that he has championed, and in a wide range of chamber music. “The Glenn Dicterow Collection,” a three-CD set on the New York Philharmonic label, features his performances of the concerti of Bruch, Bartok, Korngold, the Prokofiev second concerto, the Bernstein Serenade, among many highlights.

Glenn Dicterow and his wife, violist Karen Dreyfus, are founding members of the Lyric Piano Quartet and the Amerigo Trio, teaching, recording and performing a wide repertory, at leading festivals and musical institutions around the world.

Acclaimed as an orchestral soloist, recitalist, chamber musician, and pedagogue, KAREN DREYFUS ranks high among the violists of her era. She is a graduate of the Curtis Institute of Music and a prizewinner at such prestigious competitions as the Washington International Competition, the Lionel Tertis Competition, the Hudson Valley Competition and the Naumburg Viola Competition. A regular performer over many years with the New York Philharmonic, Orpheus Chamber Orchestra and Music From Marlboro, among many others, she has collaborated with such legendary artists as Yehudi Menuhin, Alexander Schneider, Leon Fleisher, and her husband, Glenn Dicterow. Her wide discography includes the aptly named "Romanze", a recital with the pianist Robert McDonald, recordings of Mozart’s Sinfonia Concertante (with violinist Glenn Dicterow) and William Walton’s Viola Concerto, Chick Corea’s chamber-music-meets-jazz, Grammy Award-nominated Lyric Suite for Sextet, and numerous works written expressly for Dreyfus, some included in her recording of contemporary viola concertos, American Journeys. Ms. Dreyfus currently teaches viola at the Manhattan School of Music as well as on the Orchestra Performance Program and is on faculty of the USC Thornton School of Music where she teaches viola and chamber music. During the summer season she teaches viola, chamber music and orchestral studies at the Music Academy of the West in Santa Barbara.